NASA Openscapes Champions Cohort

NASA Openscapes Champions is a mentorship and professional development opportunity for research teams using data from NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and interested in open science and migrating their analytical workflows to the cloud.

Overview

Openscapes is an approach for doing better science in less time1. We help research groups reimagine data analysis, develop modern skills that are of immediate value to them, and cultivate collaborative and inclusive research communities. Openscapes’ mentorship and community engagement approaches center on open data science as kinder science2, enabling increased efficiency and resilience for teams so that their work has more enduring impact.

Openscapes Champions is a remote-by-design mentorship program for environmental and Earth science research teams to explore open data science practices. Participants attend as a team with their research group in a cohort with other teams, together learning how to reframe data-intensive science as a collaborative effort. By discussing open software tooling and communities enabling reproducible research (e.g. R/Python, GitHub, metadata, cloud), participants develop collaborative skills, mindsets, and habits and establish shared practices for increased efficiency in their own research, while contributing to a more inclusive scientific culture.

NASA Openscapes is a 3-year project to support scientists using data from NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) as they migrate workflows to the cloud. As part of this work, we will offer the Openscapes Champions program several times from 2022-2024.

Champions Program Details

Thank you so much for your interest in the Openscapes Champions Cohort. We’ve decided to delay this cohort until early 2022 to better align with NASA cloud migration. Please check back here in late 2021 as we announce rescheduled Champions dates.


  1. nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0160↩︎

  2. blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/open-software-means-kinder-science

    ↩︎